INTERESTS

Laser-induced Graphene

Laser-induced Graphene (LIG), an alternative form of graphene, is the product of a revolutionary technique, employing CO2 laser scriber for the direct conversion of polymers into porous graphene under ambient conditions. LIG possesses graphene’s exceptional properties, with the advantage of being easy, fast, and cheap to produce. LIG can also be acutely scribe highly customizable patterns with ease and further processed with various techniques and chemical additives to improve its properties. LIG has been explored to utilize in moisture and gas sensors, strain sensors, compact wearable devices, supercapacitors, and environmental applications.​

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Laser micromachining

Laser micromachining is an essential application in laser fields. Compared with conventional mechanical processing, laser micromachining is more precise, accurate, and faster. The technology uses a laser beam and material interaction characteristics, including metal and non-metal processing of various materials, involving welding, cutting, marking, drilling, heat treatment, and other machining processes. The unique characteristics of laser make it an ideal tool for micromachining, widely used in microelectronics, micromechanics, and micro-optics machining.

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Supercapacitor Applications

One of the energy storage systems (ESS), supercapacitors, has the characteristics of high power density, fast charge/discharge and almost permanent lifetime, which can be complemented with batteries. Also, with the emergence of wearable electronics, it is necessary to develop a flexible ESS capable of achieving a high output for wireless communication. To this end, our laboratory develops and evaluates electrodes for supercapacitors on flexible polymer substrates using a laser process that can provide locally high energy.

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Synthesis of functional nanomaterials

- Heat transfer and phase change in laser-induced crystallization of silicon nanostructures
- Mass transfer in crystal growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

- In-situ monitoring of crystal growth
- Growth kinetics of nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, semiconducting nanowires)
- High-yield growth of nanomaterials

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